Birdwatching in Wagga Wagga


(Still More of) the Flora and Fauna of Willans Hill
November 11, 2009, 5:33 pm
Filed under: Flora, Fungi, General | Tags: , , , , ,

This is the third in my series of posts on the more interesting flora and fauna of the hill. The first post can be found here and the second here. A list of birds recorded on the hill is available here.

Common Everlasting (Chrysocephalum apiculatum), aka Yellow Buttons

Common Everlasting (Chrysocephalum apiculatum), aka Yellow Buttons


Australian Bindweed (Convolvulus erubescens)

Australian Bindweed (Convolvulus erubescens)


Milkmaids (Burchardia umbellata)

Milkmaids (Burchardia umbellata)


Mat-rush (Lomandra sp.)

Mat-rush (Lomandra sp.)


Chocolate Lily (Dichopogon strictus)

Chocolate Lily (Dichopogon strictus)


The specimens found on Willans Hill are typically a much richer purple than those found at Matong State Forest (see here). Dense clusters of Chocolate Lilies produce such a strong smell of chocolate that they can be detected on the basis of scent alone.

Fuzzweed (Vittadinia cuneata)

Fuzzweed (Vittadinia cuneata)


This is one of several Vittadinia species found in the area.

This next selection of images depicts some of the many fungi found on the hill. Australian fungi are not well known and therefore not easy to identify, and the names given here (in those cases where a name is given at all) are ‘best guesses’ only. If you think my guesses are wrong, let me know!

Gymnopilus junonius

Gymnopilus junonius


Puffball (Lycoperdon sp.)

Puffball (Lycoperdon sp.)


Puffball (Lycoperdon sp.)

Puffball (Lycoperdon sp.)


Bracket Fungus (possibly Piptoporus sp.)

Bracket Fungus (possibly Piptoporus sp.)


Unknown Fungus

Unknown Fungus


Earthball (Scleroderma sp.)

Earthball (Scleroderma sp.)


Puffball (Pisolithus sp.)

Puffball (Pisolithus sp.)


Psathyrella sp.

Psathyrella sp.

And now for a change of pace:

Scorpionfly (Harpobittacus sp.)

Scorpionfly (Harpobittacus sp.)


This extraordinary creature perches in place and uses its lower limbs, which end in sharp hooks, to snatch passing insects from the air. I have seen one feeding on a Common Grass-Blue (Zizina labradus) butterfly.

Orange Caterpillar Parasite Wasp (Netelia producta)

Orange Caterpillar Parasite Wasp (Netelia producta)

That’s all for now. There will be at least one more entry in this series, but the area is rapidly drying out and few wildflowers remain in bloom.

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